POLAROID TRANSFERS

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Polaroid transfers begin with a slide that I take.  I put the slide into a transfer machine into which I have already placed a package of 669 Polaroid film.  When activated, the image is transferred from the slide onto the film.  Out comes the film, and after a few seconds of developing, it is separated and the emulsion part is placed on a damp piece of watercolor paper.  It is held in place for a couple of minutes, then peeled back to reveal the image “transferred” onto the paper.  When dry, the image is enhanced with water colors and/or colored pencil, then fixed with a UV protective spray.

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© 2012 by James Everet. All rights reserved